Italian Honeymoon – Ravello Adventure

Catch up on KA’s honeymoon here

After another lazy morning (it IS an effing honeymoon, people) of Italian Breakfast and hanging out around Villa Rosa, we decided to venture up into Ravello, where I was super excited to visit the Villas Rufolo and Cimbrone.

All we had to do to reach Ravello was to follow the signs pointing to “Ravello” on the footpath (officially named Via Valle del Dragone) that crossed beneath Villa Rosa. Yep, just follow it straight up the cliffside, hah! In retrospect, the walk up wasn’t as bad as it seemed at the time, as we ended up taking a much more adventurous route on the way down. And I loved the well-marked pedestrian-only roads of the Amalfi Coast, as they made it easy to see the surrounding villages without needing a car or even the bus. Hiking and sightseeing and adventuring overlapped into something pretty special.

Road to Ravello

Road to Ravello

Via Valle del Dragone took us up past the supermercato that we had visited our first night in Atrani, and past some crumbly old farmhouses which we couldn’t quite tell if they were inhabited or abandoned. Above us, we could see the village of Scala shrouded in the mists that covered the tops of the hills. (If we had been feeling even more energetic, it is possible to hike up through Scala and come down into Amalfi on the other side of the hill.) Perched on the side of the road at the foot of the final ascent into Ravello, we even saw the remains of what I imagined was a neoclassical statue of a Roman god. (Mercury was my best guess at the time, though I couldn’t tell you why, because by the looks of the photo, he is posed with some kind of discus?)

Wandering around Ravello

Wandering around Ravello

We only encountered a handful of other adventurous sorts on the climb up to Ravello, and that and the village’s reputation as being the more relaxed of the Amalfi Coast Big 3 (Positano, Amalfi, and Ravello), did not prepare me for bustling crowds for found instead. I had wanted to fall in love with Ravello, but at first glance it did appear to be quite like Amalfi at a higher altitude. Take the photo of the cat above, for example–a little ways away from the crowds, Scott and I spotted that cat sound asleep perched on the roof of a restaurant with dizzying views. Within a minute of us pausing to take a photo, we were surrounded by a throng of tourists who heard the click of a camera and rushed over to see what there was to see. Needless to say, we flexed our wandering muscles to get the rest of the people-free picks down some lesser-traveled tiny alleys. After a stop for gelato, and a failed attempt to locate a hiking map and the vistor’s center, we headed to Villa Rufolo, which came closer to the relaxing Ravello I had been promised.

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