Italian Honeymoon – Day 2 – South to Salerno, North to Atrani

italyday2-travel

Like old times at SMN Firenze.
First glimpse at Vesuvius.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My last post left off with us rushing out of Florence, and soon we were on a train rushing through the Italian countryside. Frecciarossa’s get you there fast (for the best tips and explanations of Trenitalia, visit here), but they do not make looking out the window easy or pleasant. I mostly read and Scott mostly slept, and then we ate the paninis I was smart enough to pick up at SMN Firenze before we left. So basically, our train trip south was easy and uneventful (TIP – why does Trenitalia insist on seating you diagonally from each other when you buy seats together? Thankfully, other travelers were accommodating and moved for us to sit next to each other). Before we knew it–meaning some confusion at the Salerno train station about where to buy bus tickets and where exactly does the right bus stop–we were on the bus to Atrani.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Having visited Amalfi and Positano via bus on a high school trip, I had already experienced the insanity that is the Amalfi Coast road, and was not the biggest of fans. However since on my previous visit we’d gone south from Sorrento, not north from Salerno, I chose to face the fear and go for the views, and snagged us some cliffside seats on the left side of the bus. I thought I had properly warned Scott. Perhaps I had and he wasn’t listening, or perhaps there’s really no warning. He put his camera away and concentrated on the chaos within the bus, including the little girl (who we later found out was from Atrani and we ran into her 3 more times) who would not stop commenting on his capelli luonghi (long hair) and how he looked cattivo (“bad”).

The long and winding road.

The long and winding road.

This is a bus stop.

This is a bus stop.

But after the initial shock wore off I actually found myself feeling safe as we rode along, the bus hugging the right/cliff side at the scary turns, passing through one magical village after the next. It’s a long trip—about 1.5 hrs—and there’s not much to do besides look out the window and take photos.

italyday2-travel4

Pictures speak louder than words on the Amalfi Coast.

As we neared our final destination of Amalfi, we got glimpses of Villa San Michele, where we’d be spending a night later in the week, and our home for the week in Atrani, tucked away on the cliff side.

Villa San Michele in white and blue, perched just above the sea.

Villa San Michele in white and blue, perched just above the sea.

Spiaggia del Castiglione di Ravello. Atrani. Villa Rosa perched above the town.

Finally we arrived in Amalfi. And promptly missed the next bus going to Ravello via Atrani, and so rather than waiting another hour, splurged on a cab to take us to Villa Rossa. (Since we later learned that the bus to Ravello makes the Amalfi coast road look tame, I think it turned out for the best.)

Advertisements